Dec
09
2009
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MENSTRUAL PROBLEMS: HOW TO COPE-IN VARIOUS SITUATIONSC-AT HOME: PROBLEMS WITH BREAST-FEEDING

Some women find that the first period they have after their baby is born brings a problem they had never imagined. If you’re breast-feeding, your periods probably won’t start again until you have weaned the baby which could be anything from six weeks to a year after the birth, depending on how long you both decide to continue. But some women find that even though they are breast-feeding successfully, their periods start again. And although most babies don’t seem to notice what’s going on, others react quite strongly. As Sylvia Close puts it in her helpful book The Know-how of Infant Feeding, the baby seems to go on strike. He won’t suck; he grizzles; he’s fretful and difficult. This could be because our skins smell different at period time, or because the baby can smell our blood. Either way it’s likely to be very upsetting for a mother to be rejected like this by her baby.

But don’t worry. You can deal with it if you know how. For a start be as relaxed about the whole business as possible. Don’t give your baby a bottle and don’t try to force him to feed. Wait until he is hungry and then try again. But this time see if you can take a warm scented bath or a shower beforehand. Often this is all that’s needed. Once you smell like yourself again, the baby is happy. But I should warn you that it does sometimes take several efforts before you are back together again as you were before. If you’re bottle feeding, you are far more likely to start having periods again soon after the birth — which seems to me another very good reason to try to

breast-feed.

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Written by admin in: Pain Relief-Muscle Relaxers |
Dec
09
2009
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SCIATICA: EASING THE PAIN

While medical treatments can cure many forms of back problems, including those that give rise to sciatica, it still remains a fact that many sufferers will continue to experience pain at times because of their underlying condition. Essentially, a patient is most likely to have to cope with pain under the following circumstances:

When the problem first manifests itself, pain being almost invariably the first symptom. Naturally, depending upon the severity of the problem, the sufferer will then either seek medical help immediately or perhaps wait a while in the hope that the symptoms ease or disappear of their own account.

Even when medical treatment or other remedial therapy has been initiated, it may take a while for this to take full effect and pain may still be experienced now and then.

Then, of course, many people have what might be called ‘mild sciatica’ in that occasionally they have pain or perhaps only discomfort, which although bothersome, they feel is not severe enough to seek medical help. It needs to be stated once again that anyone experiencing symptoms severe enough to cause concern should seek medical advice. However, there’s little doubt that good though this advice is, not everyone will take it, many people preferring to try to control or reduce their pain rather than seeking to deal with the problem that may be causing it.

While the many forms of treatment available for back problems are described elsewhere in this book, in this chapter we will concentrate solely on those measures intended to eliminate or reduce pain. But first of all. . .

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Dec
09
2009
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EFFECTIVE TREATMENTS FOR BACK PAIN AND SCIATICA: PHYSIOTHERAPY

If your doctor or hospital consultant refers you to a chartered physiotherapist – or you choose to see one independently – for back pain, the first step towards treatment will almost certainly be an in-depth assessment of your condition and what led to it. As well as an examination of your posture, this assessment will include a discussion that will cover your work and leisure activities, your history of back pain, the incident leading to the pain, and the nature and site of the pain.

Physiotherapy still remains largely a hands-on profession, and the most likely treatment for back pain will involve the physiotherapist using his – or her – hands gently or more vigorously to achieve one or more of the following aims:

Mobilisation – this means freeing one or more joints in the spine, and this is accomplished by the therapist moving them, often very gently, to relieve pain or spasm.

Manipulation – or realigning a joint that is or has become misplaced. Although a vigorous manoeuvre, the least force necessary is used, and this often involves a very small movement indeed.

Massage – this can help relieve muscle spasm, increase circulation to the injured area and so speed up and promote the natural healing process.

Other treatment methods commonly used by physiotherapists include ice, hydrotherapy, and acupuncture. For an acute back problem, ice can reduce pain and increase circulation while hydrotherapy can help a patient move their back and limbs more freely in water than they may otherwise be able to do. The use of acupuncture for pain relief is also increasing.

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Written by admin in: Pain Relief-Muscle Relaxers |
Dec
09
2009
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THE MONTHLY MENSTRUAL CYCLE

For a start, it’s often a surprise to many women to realize that their wombs are really quite small. At least they are when they’re not pregnant. A non-pregnant womb is about the size of a woman’s clenched fist or a small orange; just right to be tucked safely away behind your pelvic bone, which you can feel low down in your belly linking the two inside edges of your hip bones. Your womb is virtually all thick muscle, with a small space inside it, between those thick walls, like a balloon before it’s been blown up.

That sticking out of the top of your womb, like two narrow curved horns are the two Fallopian tubes, which are specially designed to carry the newly developed egg from your ovaries into your womb. They curl round alongside the womb, so that their open ends are hovering just above your ovaries, the two glands that hold the millions of microscopic egg-cells Nature provided you with even before you were born. The open ends of the Fallopian tubes are fringed like a sea anemone and the inside of each tube is lined with little hairs, so that the

egg-cell can be wafted gently along inside it.

It seems extraordinary that the womb could carry anything as big as a full term baby, or that it could cause so much pain. But as we know, it can and it does. And one of the reasons is that although it’s quite a small bag of muscle, the muscles themselves are exceptionally strong, so when they contract, as they do when they are pushing a baby into the world, or when they are getting rid of the unwanted lining of the womb, you usually know about it.

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Dec
09
2009
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THE MEDICAL HELP THAT’S AVAILABLE: NO EASY ANSWER

It has to be said straightaway that any medical treatment for period pain will vary according to the doctor or clinic treating you and according to which particular hormone they think is causing the trouble. It would be lovely if someone could discover a magic pill, or’ one easy treatment that would just stop the pain wherever it was or whatever was causing it. But our body systems are just too complicated for an easy solution like that; so complicated in fact that we’re only just beginning to understand how they work. When the late great Dr Winnicott was asked what he thought about sex education in schools, he replied, ‘But we don’t even know why girls have periods.’ And he was right; we don’t. But at least, we are beginning to find out how we have them. And an intriguing business it is, with chemical messengers, or hormones, racing around our bloodstream virtually all through the month. The trouble is that there are so many of them, all different and all with a different part to play in the whole process. And any one of them could be at fault when the system goes wrong.

If we’re to understand what sort of treatments are currently being offered by doctors and clinics, it’s helpful to know a bit about how our systems work. Or at least to be able to identify the hormones doctors think are causing the trouble. So the next section is a potted history of what goes on inside a woman, month by month. If you’re squeamish, or you would prefer not to know, then skip the next bit. But if, like me, you’re fascinated that we should carry such a delicate, complicated, finely balanced miracle inside us — read on.

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Written by admin in: Pain Relief-Muscle Relaxers |
Dec
09
2009
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MENSTRUAL PROBLEMS: HOW TO COPE-IN VARIOUS SITUATIONSC-AT SCHOOL:

PRESSURE GROUP TACTICS

You and your friends may well have worked out that a change of school policy would help a lot of you cope more easily with the difficult business of being a woman and a schoolgirl at the same time. You might want to persuade the Head to allow you to wear trousers, for example, or to permit you to stay inside in the warm at break and lunchtimes; to opt out of games or to convert an unused space into a rest room or a sick bay; or to persuade the staff to give you a week’s notice of homework so that you can plan your lives. One or two of you may have made tentative approaches about it and been turned down, so you could be thinking of forming a pressure group. If you are, remember that there are rules to the game and you are more likely to succeed if you follow them.

Start by involving as many of your parents as you can. Parents are far more influential than they realize. Then try to involve the seniors as well. Half the girls in the fifth form have far more impact than two lone second formers. Assume that the Head and his/her staff will agree with what you say and be sympathetic. Most of them will be, eventually, and those who aren’t will find it more difficult to refuse you if you approach them confidently and politely and obviously expecting a favourable answer. If you are thinking of a petition, take great care with the wording. Get parents to help you. And if you are using a spokeswoman, make sure you send her to plead for you at the right time in her month. Last but not least, try not to look too fierce! A smile gets results much quicker than a scowl. Good luck!

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Written by admin in: Pain Relief-Muscle Relaxers |
Dec
09
2009
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MENSTRUAL PROBLEMS: HOW TO COPE-IN VARIOUS SITUATIONSC-AT SCHOOL:

DEPRESSION

The trouble with giving general advice like this is that what is a good idea for one girl could be really bad advice for another. I once told four girls, all suffering from depression before their periods, that one way of coping would be to write a message on a card and stick the card inside their school desks. The message read: ‘Everything will be much better on . . .’ and then the day they expected their particular period to start. One girl said it was a great help; she didn’t feel any less depressed but at least she could ‘see a light at the end of the tunnel’. The second, though, said her card made her feel so much worse that in the end she tore it up and threw it in the

waste-paper basket. The third drew doodles all over hers and forgot to read it. And the fourth was put in detention for opening her desk too often during the lesson.

Depression is a very difficult state to deal with and it’s particularly acute at schools. Our educational system ensures there will always be plenty of pupils around who either fail to come up to expectations or, worse, to pass exams. If you have failed, you have to learn to come to terms with failure, which is a pretty depressing thing in itself without having the additional burden of a monthly dose of the blues.

There are lots of remedies for depression. But if you think exams and the fear of failure are part of the cause of your blues, take heart. They may seem terribly important when you are at school, but they get considerably less important the farther away from school you get and the more competent you become in the real business of earning a living.

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Dec
09
2009
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MENSTRUAL PROBLEMS: HOW TO COPE-IN VARIOUS SITUATIONSC-AT SCHOOL:

TROUBLESOME MISERIES-CLUMSINESS

If you suffer from the aching miseries, then life at school can frequently be very difficult. To be suddenly and inexplicably clumsy can have dire results, especially if you are usually neat and deft. Your handwriting may degenerate, no matter how hard you try to keep it tidy, with the result that you get lower grades and teachers disapprove. You may be suddenly unco-ordinated, so that you walk into desks instead of round them, or do badly at games, or you become a menace in the science labs. That doesn’t improve your popularity either, which in its turn will make you feel even more upset and vulnerable and off-balance.

If you’re clumsy like this, one trick is to try to do everything slowly. Breathe in a lower, deeper gear as described and take a few minutes to relax as much of your body as you can. You’ll find the more relaxed you are, the less clumsy you are likely to be. Try to make a joke of your clumsiness if you can. But above all, keep that chart going, so that you can predict your clumsy times and try to avoid some of the more tricky situations. Obviously it’s a good idea to keep out of harm’s way as much as you can. It’s not a good time of the month to be working backstage, or putting in overtime in the labs or shifting PE equipment about. But most important of all, let your ally on the staff know what you’re doing. Show her the chart. She could be the one who will explain to your other teachers that you are not being lazy or bolshie, or going out of your way to produce poor work, or letting the side down, or whatever it is.

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Written by admin in: Pain Relief-Muscle Relaxers |

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