Jul
02
2011
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EVALUATING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

EVALUATING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
If you have high blood pressure, your doctor will want to obtain a careful medical history, perform a physical examination, and perform a limited number of tests to answer the following three questions before deciding on the best method of treatment:
1. Is there damage to any organs?
2. Are there other cardiovascular risk factors?
3. Is the high blood pressure primary or a form of secondary (and possibly curable) hypertension?
To answer these questions, your doctor may order some laboratory tests to determine whether you have cardiovascular disease and, if so, its severity. If the physical examination and laboratory findings are normal, most people with mildly elevated blood pressure will not need further tests. However, further assessment may be needed if any of the following conditions exist:
sudden onset or abrupt acceleration of high blood pressure
very high diastolic pressure (greater than 110 mm Hg)
low blood potassium level
evidence of kidney abnormalities
doctor hears a bruit (pronounced “BREW-ee”), which is the sound of blood flowing through a narrowed vessel.
Be sure to tell your doctor if you are taking any prescription or over-the- counter medications, for two reasons. First, some medications raise blood pressure. Cold, allergy and sinus  medicines, nose sprays, and diet pills can all raise blood pressure. Second, certain medications can have dangerous reactions with medications your doctor may prescribe for high blood pressure. These include certain heart medications, psychiatric medications, and diuretics (“water pills”).
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If you have high blood pressure, your doctor will want to obtain a careful medical history, perform a physical examination, and perform a limited number of tests to answer the following three questions before deciding on the best method of treatment:
1. Is there damage to any organs?
2. Are there other cardiovascular risk factors?
3. Is the high blood pressure primary or a form of secondary (and possibly curable) hypertension?
To answer these questions, your doctor may order some laboratory tests to determine whether you have cardiovascular disease and, if so, its severity. If the physical examination and laboratory findings are normal, most people with mildly elevated blood pressure will not need further tests. However, further assessment may be needed if any of the following conditions exist:
sudden onset or abrupt acceleration of high blood pressure
very high diastolic pressure (greater than 110 mm Hg)
low blood potassium level
evidence of kidney abnormalities
doctor hears a bruit (pronounced “BREW-ee”), which is the sound of blood flowing through a narrowed vessel.
Be sure to tell your doctor if you are taking any prescription or over-the- counter medications, for two reasons. First, some medications raise blood pressure. Cold, allergy and sinus  medicines, nose sprays, and diet pills can all raise blood pressure. Second, certain medications can have dangerous reactions with medications your doctor may prescribe for high blood pressure. These include certain heart medications, psychiatric medications, and diuretics (“water pills”).
*260\252\8*
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Written by admin in: Cardio & Blood-Сholesterol |
Jan
30
2011
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HEART RHYTHMS: HEART RATE AND PULSE

HEART RHYTHMS: HEART RATE AND PULSE
Abnormal heart speeds and rhythms can occur in normal persons as well as in those who have various types of heart disease. Some rhythms are harmless, but others may tire the heart by causing it to overwork. As stated, the normal heart rate is 60 to 100 beats per minute. An average person has a rate of 70 to 80. During exercise, excitement, or when a person is running a fever, the heart rate may increase to 120 to 130 beats per minute. This acceleration is perfectly normal.
Some persons are very much aware of an accelerated pulse when they are excited or nervous. Such a person may believe that something is wrong with his heart because he can feel it beating. If he is able to count his pulse, however, and if it is in the range described above, he should realize that there is usually nothing wrong with the heart itself.
The pulse is counted by placing the tip of the index finger of one hand on the opposite wrist at the side of the wrist that the thumb arises from. Cords will be felt running along under the skin, and between these cords a pulsation is felt. If the index finger is pressed too hard, the pulse will be obliterated, and if pressure is too light, no pulse will be felt. To determine the pulse or heart rate, count the number of impulses felt during one minute.
*24/309/5*
Abnormal heart speeds and rhythms can occur in normal persons as well as in those who have various types of heart disease. Some rhythms are harmless, but others may tire the heart by causing it to overwork. As stated, the normal heart rate is 60 to 100 beats per minute. An average person has a rate of 70 to 80. During exercise, excitement, or when a person is running a fever, the heart rate may increase to 120 to 130 beats per minute. This acceleration is perfectly normal.
Some persons are very much aware of an accelerated pulse when they are excited or nervous. Such a person may believe that something is wrong with his heart because he can feel it beating. If he is able to count his pulse, however, and if it is in the range described above, he should realize that there is usually nothing wrong with the heart itself.
The pulse is counted by placing the tip of the index finger of one hand on the opposite wrist at the side of the wrist that the thumb arises from. Cords will be felt running along under the skin, and between these cords a pulsation is felt. If the index finger is pressed too hard, the pulse will be obliterated, and if pressure is too light, no pulse will be felt. To determine the pulse or heart rate, count the number of impulses felt during one minute.
*24/309/5*
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Written by admin in: Cardio & Blood-Сholesterol |

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