Jan
12
2011
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THE CANDIDA-ASTHMA CONNECTION: NUTRITIONAL NEEDS OF CANDIDA ALBICANS

THE CANDIDA-ASTHMA CONNECTION: NUTRITIONAL NEEDS OF CANDIDA ALBICANS
Growth is promoted by a variety of sugars and polysaccharides, particularly glucose, corn sugar and biotin. It has been found that galactose caused the greatest adherence of Candida albicans, followed by glucose, fructose, sucrose and maltose; while protein-digesting enzymes reduced the ability of Candida albicans to adhere to vaginal and other epilethial surfaces. Because the ability of these organisms to adhere is a measure of their toxicity, it is also important to know that cholesterol and egg phospholipids block adherence while oleic and palmitic acid (as in olive and palm oils) do not.
Candida albicans will grow rapidly in a medium of sugars, biotin and inorganic salts. When starches and other sugars, such as lycogen and dextrene, are added to the medium, the Candida grows a little more slowly but produces more filaments. Candida albicans forms mycelia on human serum with almost all amino acids, glucose and at an acid pH. When Candida albicans growth rates in cultures containing either plenty or very little biotin were compared, it was found that the higher the biotin content, the greater the yeast form grew. So biotin represents a two-edged sword. It encourages an increase in Candida albicans but makes it less likely to change into the myceal form. Since both forms can be pathogenic or change into a pathogenic form, however, the use of biotin can create as many problems as it may solve. There is another problem. During the growth process, the yeast form of Candida albicans is more virulent than the myceal form, and at a lower temperature. If copper is added, then the myceal form becomes more virulent than the yeast form, which is one more reason for avoiding tap water, since it often has a high copper content. The old belief that one form, the myceal, was dangerous and the other (bud yeast) was not, has been shown conclusively to be invalid by the work of Professor Coral Saltarelli. In fact the myceal forms can revert to the bud yeast form if they are supplied with cysteine. The budding forms then tend to be more pathogenic.
The antibiotic tetracyclin was found to increase the toxicity of both the yeast and myceal forms of Candida albicans. Considering the widespread use and abuse of this medication, often in young people with acne or similar skin conditions, one must wonder if this fact alone may be responsible for the increasing incidence of this complaint.
The vitamin and amino acid requirements of Candida albicans have been extensively studied. It was found that some Candida species did not require any vitamins but Candida albicans and some of its variants were definitely in need of biotin. Some amino acids reduce the need for biotin. No external supply of amino acids is needed by Candida albicans, which indicates that it can synthesise all the amino acids it needs in the presence of biotin.
In immunologically compromised people, such as organ transplant recipients, patients taking corticosteroids and people undergoing intensive antibiotic therapy, the organism can spread systematically and even cause death.
When drugs such as the anti-fungals amphotericin B or nystatin were used to treat Candida albicans, they were found to be very successful in killing the fungus. At the same time, if doses were too low, fungal growth was enhanced. In other words, too little anti-fungal medication given for too short a period of time may actually make the problem worse. This is a very important fact to bear in mind because patients often stop taking their prescribed anti-fungals as soon as some of the symptoms disappear or reduce in severity.
Often we see people who have taken anti-fungals at a low dose, say two to four tablets per day for a week or so, who are not aware that this may cause the organism to overgrow later on and cause other, not necessarily vaginal, problems. The same applies to diets, which may have to be followed for many months until the yeast infection and possible allergies or intolerances have been successfully treated.
Many commonly used medications such as sulphonamides, or the antibiotics septrim or bactrim, actually impair the body’s ability to control and kill Candida albicans.
*55\145\2*
Growth is promoted by a variety of sugars and polysaccharides, particularly glucose, corn sugar and biotin. It has been found that galactose caused the greatest adherence of Candida albicans, followed by glucose, fructose, sucrose and maltose; while protein-digesting enzymes reduced the ability of Candida albicans to adhere to vaginal and other epilethial surfaces. Because the ability of these organisms to adhere is a measure of their toxicity, it is also important to know that cholesterol and egg phospholipids block adherence while oleic and palmitic acid (as in olive and palm oils) do not.
Candida albicans will grow rapidly in a medium of sugars, biotin and inorganic salts. When starches and other sugars, such as lycogen and dextrene, are added to the medium, the Candida grows a little more slowly but produces more filaments. Candida albicans forms mycelia on human serum with almost all amino acids, glucose and at an acid pH. When Candida albicans growth rates in cultures containing either plenty or very little biotin were compared, it was found that the higher the biotin content, the greater the yeast form grew. So biotin represents a two-edged sword. It encourages an increase in Candida albicans but makes it less likely to change into the myceal form. Since both forms can be pathogenic or change into a pathogenic form, however, the use of biotin can create as many problems as it may solve. There is another problem. During the growth process, the yeast form of Candida albicans is more virulent than the myceal form, and at a lower temperature. If copper is added, then the myceal form becomes more virulent than the yeast form, which is one more reason for avoiding tap water, since it often has a high copper content. The old belief that one form, the myceal, was dangerous and the other (bud yeast) was not, has been shown conclusively to be invalid by the work of Professor Coral Saltarelli. In fact the myceal forms can revert to the bud yeast form if they are supplied with cysteine. The budding forms then tend to be more pathogenic.
The antibiotic tetracyclin was found to increase the toxicity of both the yeast and myceal forms of Candida albicans. Considering the widespread use and abuse of this medication, often in young people with acne or similar skin conditions, one must wonder if this fact alone may be responsible for the increasing incidence of this complaint.
The vitamin and amino acid requirements of Candida albicans have been extensively studied. It was found that some Candida species did not require any vitamins but Candida albicans and some of its variants were definitely in need of biotin. Some amino acids reduce the need for biotin. No external supply of amino acids is needed by Candida albicans, which indicates that it can synthesise all the amino acids it needs in the presence of biotin.
In immunologically compromised people, such as organ transplant recipients, patients taking corticosteroids and people undergoing intensive antibiotic therapy, the organism can spread systematically and even cause death.
When drugs such as the anti-fungals amphotericin B or nystatin were used to treat Candida albicans, they were found to be very successful in killing the fungus. At the same time, if doses were too low, fungal growth was enhanced. In other words, too little anti-fungal medication given for too short a period of time may actually make the problem worse. This is a very important fact to bear in mind because patients often stop taking their prescribed anti-fungals as soon as some of the symptoms disappear or reduce in severity.
Often we see people who have taken anti-fungals at a low dose, say two to four tablets per day for a week or so, who are not aware that this may cause the organism to overgrow later on and cause other, not necessarily vaginal, problems. The same applies to diets, which may have to be followed for many months until the yeast infection and possible allergies or intolerances have been successfully treated.
Many commonly used medications such as sulphonamides, or the antibiotics septrim or bactrim, actually impair the body’s ability to control and kill Candida albicans.
*55\145\2*
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Written by admin in: Allergies |
Dec
09
2009
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THE ECOLOGY UNIT IN THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF ALLERGIES: PATIENTS’ PARTICIPATION

The patient is responsible for recording his reactions to the various foods and chemicals according to the instructions which he is given. He is also responsible for other aspects of his own diagnosis and treatment, to an extent unusual in most hospitals.

For example, he is given precise instructions on how to take his own pulse—5 minutes before, and 20, 40, and 60 minutes after the end of each meal. The pulse must be taken for a full minute, and the patient cannot be active or even go to the bathroom immediately before taking it. Any form of physical activity will invalidate the results.

The patient must be disciplined enough not to leave the unit for several weeks nor to eat any substance other than what is ordered for him by the doctor. He also must not smoke at any time while under treatment.

Most of all, the patient must cooperate in learning. There is a great deal to learn: new concepts, many of them quite at variance with conventional wisdom on nutrition and health. This is not an easy task for many patients who come to the hospital in a confused or even a bewildered state. They have been sick, often for years, and have usually been through a gamut of unsuccessful medical experiences. Suddenly, they are confronted by concepts and techniques which seem alien to everything that went before.

Unless the patient has some intellectual curiosity, then, it is difficult for him to get the most out of this program. Some patients are so befuddled by their disease that they find it too much of a challenge. Most patients, however, are eager to try something truly different—an alternative approach to their problems.

*98/110/2*

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Written by admin in: Allergies |

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