Jul
02
2011
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EVALUATING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

EVALUATING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
If you have high blood pressure, your doctor will want to obtain a careful medical history, perform a physical examination, and perform a limited number of tests to answer the following three questions before deciding on the best method of treatment:
1. Is there damage to any organs?
2. Are there other cardiovascular risk factors?
3. Is the high blood pressure primary or a form of secondary (and possibly curable) hypertension?
To answer these questions, your doctor may order some laboratory tests to determine whether you have cardiovascular disease and, if so, its severity. If the physical examination and laboratory findings are normal, most people with mildly elevated blood pressure will not need further tests. However, further assessment may be needed if any of the following conditions exist:
sudden onset or abrupt acceleration of high blood pressure
very high diastolic pressure (greater than 110 mm Hg)
low blood potassium level
evidence of kidney abnormalities
doctor hears a bruit (pronounced “BREW-ee”), which is the sound of blood flowing through a narrowed vessel.
Be sure to tell your doctor if you are taking any prescription or over-the- counter medications, for two reasons. First, some medications raise blood pressure. Cold, allergy and sinus  medicines, nose sprays, and diet pills can all raise blood pressure. Second, certain medications can have dangerous reactions with medications your doctor may prescribe for high blood pressure. These include certain heart medications, psychiatric medications, and diuretics (“water pills”).
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If you have high blood pressure, your doctor will want to obtain a careful medical history, perform a physical examination, and perform a limited number of tests to answer the following three questions before deciding on the best method of treatment:
1. Is there damage to any organs?
2. Are there other cardiovascular risk factors?
3. Is the high blood pressure primary or a form of secondary (and possibly curable) hypertension?
To answer these questions, your doctor may order some laboratory tests to determine whether you have cardiovascular disease and, if so, its severity. If the physical examination and laboratory findings are normal, most people with mildly elevated blood pressure will not need further tests. However, further assessment may be needed if any of the following conditions exist:
sudden onset or abrupt acceleration of high blood pressure
very high diastolic pressure (greater than 110 mm Hg)
low blood potassium level
evidence of kidney abnormalities
doctor hears a bruit (pronounced “BREW-ee”), which is the sound of blood flowing through a narrowed vessel.
Be sure to tell your doctor if you are taking any prescription or over-the- counter medications, for two reasons. First, some medications raise blood pressure. Cold, allergy and sinus  medicines, nose sprays, and diet pills can all raise blood pressure. Second, certain medications can have dangerous reactions with medications your doctor may prescribe for high blood pressure. These include certain heart medications, psychiatric medications, and diuretics (“water pills”).
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Written by admin in: Cardio & Blood-Сholesterol |

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