May
27
2011
--

CANCER AND NUTRITION: ZINC

CANCER AND NUTRITION: ZINC
Zinc is a metal that is essential for good growth and development, protein synthesis, and wound healing, and it is a functional part of many enzymes. Danbolt and Closs have shown that zinc deficiency produces the symptoms and problems of an inherited disease called acrodermatitis enteropathica, which consists of multiple skin and gastrointestinal problems. This disease is completely cured by dietary zinc supplementation.
More importantly, zinc is intimately involved in immune function and the development of cancer. This subject has been extensively reviewed by Robert A. Good and colleagues. Zinc has the following effects:
Zinc deficiency decreases the number of T cells and suppressor T cells, which could potentially lead to the development of cancer. However, phagocytes are more efficient with low blood levels of zinc.
Zinc deficiency is seen in patients with several different types of cancers, but this is related to poor dietary habits rather than to the cancer itself.
Zinc excess and zinc deficiency have both been shown to inhibit tumor growth in animals. Whereas zinc deficiency stimulates anticancer inflammatory cells, zinc-supplemented animals have augmented T-cell anticancer activity.
*33\360\2*
Zinc is a metal that is essential for good growth and development, protein synthesis, and wound healing, and it is a functional part of many enzymes. Danbolt and Closs have shown that zinc deficiency produces the symptoms and problems of an inherited disease called acrodermatitis enteropathica, which consists of multiple skin and gastrointestinal problems. This disease is completely cured by dietary zinc supplementation.
More importantly, zinc is intimately involved in immune function and the development of cancer. This subject has been extensively reviewed by Robert A. Good and colleagues. Zinc has the following effects:
Zinc deficiency decreases the number of T cells and suppressor T cells, which could potentially lead to the development of cancer. However, phagocytes are more efficient with low blood levels of zinc.
Zinc deficiency is seen in patients with several different types of cancers, but this is related to poor dietary habits rather than to the cancer itself.
Zinc excess and zinc deficiency have both been shown to inhibit tumor growth in animals. Whereas zinc deficiency stimulates anticancer inflammatory cells, zinc-supplemented animals have augmented T-cell anticancer activity.
*33\360\2*
Google Bookmarks Digg Reddit del.icio.us Ma.gnolia Technorati Slashdot Yahoo My Web
Written by admin in: Cancer |

Powered by WordPress | Aeros Theme | TheBuckmaker.com WordPress Themes