May
27
2011
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CANCER AND NUTRITION: ZINC

CANCER AND NUTRITION: ZINC
Zinc is a metal that is essential for good growth and development, protein synthesis, and wound healing, and it is a functional part of many enzymes. Danbolt and Closs have shown that zinc deficiency produces the symptoms and problems of an inherited disease called acrodermatitis enteropathica, which consists of multiple skin and gastrointestinal problems. This disease is completely cured by dietary zinc supplementation.
More importantly, zinc is intimately involved in immune function and the development of cancer. This subject has been extensively reviewed by Robert A. Good and colleagues. Zinc has the following effects:
Zinc deficiency decreases the number of T cells and suppressor T cells, which could potentially lead to the development of cancer. However, phagocytes are more efficient with low blood levels of zinc.
Zinc deficiency is seen in patients with several different types of cancers, but this is related to poor dietary habits rather than to the cancer itself.
Zinc excess and zinc deficiency have both been shown to inhibit tumor growth in animals. Whereas zinc deficiency stimulates anticancer inflammatory cells, zinc-supplemented animals have augmented T-cell anticancer activity.
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Zinc is a metal that is essential for good growth and development, protein synthesis, and wound healing, and it is a functional part of many enzymes. Danbolt and Closs have shown that zinc deficiency produces the symptoms and problems of an inherited disease called acrodermatitis enteropathica, which consists of multiple skin and gastrointestinal problems. This disease is completely cured by dietary zinc supplementation.
More importantly, zinc is intimately involved in immune function and the development of cancer. This subject has been extensively reviewed by Robert A. Good and colleagues. Zinc has the following effects:
Zinc deficiency decreases the number of T cells and suppressor T cells, which could potentially lead to the development of cancer. However, phagocytes are more efficient with low blood levels of zinc.
Zinc deficiency is seen in patients with several different types of cancers, but this is related to poor dietary habits rather than to the cancer itself.
Zinc excess and zinc deficiency have both been shown to inhibit tumor growth in animals. Whereas zinc deficiency stimulates anticancer inflammatory cells, zinc-supplemented animals have augmented T-cell anticancer activity.
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Written by admin in: Cancer |
May
18
2011
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WHY YOU CAN’T STAY AWAKE: THE PHYSICAL CAUSES OF SLEEP APNEA

WHY YOU CAN’T STAY AWAKE: THE PHYSICAL CAUSES OF SLEEP APNEA
What is the physical process that leads to sleep apnea? Almost always apneic episodes result from an obstruction of the pharynx occurring somewhere between the nose and the epiglottis— the membrane that prevents food from going down the wrong “pipe.” The upper airway, from the mouth and nose to the lungs, is not just a hollow tube through which breath moves: the coordinated activity of a number of muscles is required if this airway is to work efficiently and effectively. As we breathe in, these muscles must contract, in synchronized fashion, to pull the passage open: this muscle contraction, as well as our instinct to breathe, is controlled by the central respiratory drive in the brain. Like many bodily structures, the upper airway is pretty delicate: it doesn’t take a very big difference in air pressure between the atmosphere and the inside of the throat to cause the passageway to collapse. The muscles must therefore work continually to keep the tube open.
As we have seen, a number of factors—among them drugs, alcohol, and, to some extent, sleep itself—can suppress the central respiratory drive, especially during slow-wave sleep and the REM phase. Alcohol is a particular threat; not only does it suppress the breathing drive, it also relaxes the throat muscles, reducing their ability to keep the airway open. What’s more, alcohol weakens the mechanism that helps us wake up quickly, thus adding to the time it takes to become aroused enough to make the conscious effort needed to breathe. I tell all patients with apnea that use of alcohol, other than perhaps a very small quantity (less than an ounce), is inadvisable. If they must drink, I ask them to do so no later than four to six hours before bedtime.
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What is the physical process that leads to sleep apnea? Almost always apneic episodes result from an obstruction of the pharynx occurring somewhere between the nose and the epiglottis— the membrane that prevents food from going down the wrong “pipe.” The upper airway, from the mouth and nose to the lungs, is not just a hollow tube through which breath moves: the coordinated activity of a number of muscles is required if this airway is to work efficiently and effectively. As we breathe in, these muscles must contract, in synchronized fashion, to pull the passage open: this muscle contraction, as well as our instinct to breathe, is controlled by the central respiratory drive in the brain. Like many bodily structures, the upper airway is pretty delicate: it doesn’t take a very big difference in air pressure between the atmosphere and the inside of the throat to cause the passageway to collapse. The muscles must therefore work continually to keep the tube open.
As we have seen, a number of factors—among them drugs, alcohol, and, to some extent, sleep itself—can suppress the central respiratory drive, especially during slow-wave sleep and the REM phase. Alcohol is a particular threat; not only does it suppress the breathing drive, it also relaxes the throat muscles, reducing their ability to keep the airway open. What’s more, alcohol weakens the mechanism that helps us wake up quickly, thus adding to the time it takes to become aroused enough to make the conscious effort needed to breathe. I tell all patients with apnea that use of alcohol, other than perhaps a very small quantity (less than an ounce), is inadvisable. If they must drink, I ask them to do so no later than four to six hours before bedtime.
*136\226\8*
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Written by admin in: Anti Depressants-Sleeping Aid |
May
08
2011
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HIV: SKIN PROBLEMS-RED RASH

HIV: SKIN PROBLEMS-RED RASH
A rash is usually either diffusely red all over or red only in spots or blotches. It usually appears on the chest, back, arms, face, and legs. Rashes can be accompanied by other symptoms, including fever, swelling of the face, giant welts, or itching.
The most common cause of a red rash covering large areas of the body in people with HIV infection is an adverse reaction to a drug. The most common offending drug is a sulfa
drug—especially trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra), the drug usually given for the treatment or prevention of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Sulfa drugs are also treatments for many other infectious diseases in people with and without AIDS. Rashes that are a reaction to sulfa drugs are especially common in people with HIV infection: 30 percent to 50 percent of people with HIV infection have these rashes. In addition to rashes, many people also have fever, low white blood cell counts, or tests showing hepatitis. All these symptoms disappear when the sulfa drug is stopped.
Other drugs can also cause rashes; rashes simply seem to be especially common with the sulfa drugs. One of the problems with identifying the cause of rashes is that they can occur with almost any drug, and many people with HIV infection are taking many drugs. To find out which drug is causing the rash, the physician may stop one drug at a time every two or three days, beginning with the drug most likely to be responsible. Or the physician may suggest a drug holiday: all drugs are stopped, then only those that are necessary are started again.
When the rash occurs, talk to a physician. This consultation is especially important if the drugs causing the rash are also causing such symptoms as swelling of the face, difficulty breathing, large and itching welts, fever, or dizziness when standing (suggesting low blood pressure).
In addition to stopping the drug, the rashes are often treated with antihistamines like Dramamine which can be purchased without a prescription, or with prescription drugs that are sometimes more effective. More serious reactions may require treatment with corticosteroids.
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A rash is usually either diffusely red all over or red only in spots or blotches. It usually appears on the chest, back, arms, face, and legs. Rashes can be accompanied by other symptoms, including fever, swelling of the face, giant welts, or itching.
The most common cause of a red rash covering large areas of the body in people with HIV infection is an adverse reaction to a drug. The most common offending drug is a sulfa
drug—especially trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra), the drug usually given for the treatment or prevention of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Sulfa drugs are also treatments for many other infectious diseases in people with and without AIDS. Rashes that are a reaction to sulfa drugs are especially common in people with HIV infection: 30 percent to 50 percent of people with HIV infection have these rashes. In addition to rashes, many people also have fever, low white blood cell counts, or tests showing hepatitis. All these symptoms disappear when the sulfa drug is stopped.
Other drugs can also cause rashes; rashes simply seem to be especially common with the sulfa drugs. One of the problems with identifying the cause of rashes is that they can occur with almost any drug, and many people with HIV infection are taking many drugs. To find out which drug is causing the rash, the physician may stop one drug at a time every two or three days, beginning with the drug most likely to be responsible. Or the physician may suggest a drug holiday: all drugs are stopped, then only those that are necessary are started again.
When the rash occurs, talk to a physician. This consultation is especially important if the drugs causing the rash are also causing such symptoms as swelling of the face, difficulty breathing, large and itching welts, fever, or dizziness when standing (suggesting low blood pressure).
In addition to stopping the drug, the rashes are often treated with antihistamines like Dramamine which can be purchased without a prescription, or with prescription drugs that are sometimes more effective. More serious reactions may require treatment with corticosteroids.
*111\191\2*
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Written by admin in: General health,HIV |

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