Jan
30
2011

HEART RHYTHMS: HEART RATE AND PULSE

HEART RHYTHMS: HEART RATE AND PULSE
Abnormal heart speeds and rhythms can occur in normal persons as well as in those who have various types of heart disease. Some rhythms are harmless, but others may tire the heart by causing it to overwork. As stated, the normal heart rate is 60 to 100 beats per minute. An average person has a rate of 70 to 80. During exercise, excitement, or when a person is running a fever, the heart rate may increase to 120 to 130 beats per minute. This acceleration is perfectly normal.
Some persons are very much aware of an accelerated pulse when they are excited or nervous. Such a person may believe that something is wrong with his heart because he can feel it beating. If he is able to count his pulse, however, and if it is in the range described above, he should realize that there is usually nothing wrong with the heart itself.
The pulse is counted by placing the tip of the index finger of one hand on the opposite wrist at the side of the wrist that the thumb arises from. Cords will be felt running along under the skin, and between these cords a pulsation is felt. If the index finger is pressed too hard, the pulse will be obliterated, and if pressure is too light, no pulse will be felt. To determine the pulse or heart rate, count the number of impulses felt during one minute.
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Abnormal heart speeds and rhythms can occur in normal persons as well as in those who have various types of heart disease. Some rhythms are harmless, but others may tire the heart by causing it to overwork. As stated, the normal heart rate is 60 to 100 beats per minute. An average person has a rate of 70 to 80. During exercise, excitement, or when a person is running a fever, the heart rate may increase to 120 to 130 beats per minute. This acceleration is perfectly normal.
Some persons are very much aware of an accelerated pulse when they are excited or nervous. Such a person may believe that something is wrong with his heart because he can feel it beating. If he is able to count his pulse, however, and if it is in the range described above, he should realize that there is usually nothing wrong with the heart itself.
The pulse is counted by placing the tip of the index finger of one hand on the opposite wrist at the side of the wrist that the thumb arises from. Cords will be felt running along under the skin, and between these cords a pulsation is felt. If the index finger is pressed too hard, the pulse will be obliterated, and if pressure is too light, no pulse will be felt. To determine the pulse or heart rate, count the number of impulses felt during one minute.
*24/309/5*
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Written by admin in: Cardio & Blood-Сholesterol |

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